Screencast.com’s Desktop Uploader

You may think of Screencast.com as just the most convenient way to host your Jing content so you can quickly send a link to someone.

In fact, Screencast.com can host virtually anything. Usually it’s images or video, but there’s no reason you couldn’t upload a PowerPoint presentation or a huge ZIP file containing project resources.

Before getting into the Desktop Uploader (which is free and works on both Mac and PC), I should make clear the uploader doesn’t have anything to do with Jing directly. The best way to send your Jing images and videos to Screencast.com is to do it straight through Jing. The purpose of this post is to show how you might take more advantage of the Screencast.com account you got with Jing.

Here are some typical scenarios where people use the Desktop Uploader:

  • You have a file that’s way too big to attach to an email. You upload it to Screencast.com, then email the link to the file. Your recipients download it themselves. (Learn how to make content down-loadable to viewers.)
  • You want to back up a bunch of videos or files. You select them all and upload them to Screencast.com via the uploader.
  • You’re looking for feedback on the latest (non-Jing) screencast you made. You upload it to a password-protected folder that contains previous versions. It’s easy for the viewers to look at each draft.
  • You need to work on something at home, but you forgot your USB drive. You can upload it to yourself.

The Desktop Uploader is easy to download and install. Be sure to keep the following in mind–especially if you’re using a free Screencast.com account:

A free account comes with 2 GB bandwidth per month. Bandwidth is the total amount of data you can transfer per month. For example, if 10 people downloaded your 10 MB video, that would be 100 MB–or 5% of your monthly allowance. As you can see, using the Desktop Uploader with large files for yourself or with a small group is one thing, but trying to share a large video with hundreds of students or the public could chew up that bandwidth pretty quick. You can always check your bandwidth. Learn how here.

Posted in Tips & How To's
Author
Mike Curtis

Mike Curtis is an Educational Technologist at TechSmith. He works closely with the User Assistance team, doing what he can to help everyone be successful with our products.